Single Stroke Seven - Drum Rudiment

The single stroke seven is one of the 40 International Drum Rudiments since 1984. The Percussive Arts Society (P.A.S.) was responsible for its inclusion, after settling on the expansion of the 26 American Drum Rudiments with orchestral, drum corps, European, and contemporary drum rudiments.

The single stroke seven features seven consecutive alternating single strokes that can be played as 8th note triplets or as 16th note triplets. The exclusive use of single strokes to play the single stroke seven is what makes this a pattern from the single stroke family of drum rudiments. You can actually think of the single stroke seven as a single stroke four with three extra strokes added in. Therefore, learning how to play the single stroke four will make it easier for you to master the single stroke seven. Practice the single stroke seven leading with both hands since it does not naturally alternate within itself. Strive for playing consistent sounding and evenly spaced strokes.

Single Stroke Seven

Once you're able to play the single stroke seven comfortably on a single surface, you can move on to learn how to apply the single stroke seven to the drum set.

Exercise #1 is a half-time 8th note triplet drum beat. There's a single stroke seven between the hi-hat and the snare drum. Start by playing the single stroke seven on the hi-hat. Once you can play the single stroke seven comfortably, move the seventh stroke to the snare drum. Add the bass drum on count 1 and the floor tom on count 4 when you're able to play the single stroke seven comfortably between the hi-hat and the snare drum.

Single Stroke Seven #1

Exercise #2 is another half-time 8th note triplet drum beat. This exercise features the same rhythmic pattern as exercise #1. What changes here is the stroke orchestration. This is a great way of coming up with new drum beats from the ones you already know how to play. You can take any drum beat and just move the strokes around the drums and cymbals to get different sounding patterns.

Single Stroke Seven #2

Exercise #3 is an 8th note triplet drum fill. This exercise features a single stroke seven between counts 1 and 3, and a single stroke four between count 4 and count 1 on the following measure. Leading this pattern with the right hand will be troublesome when transitioning from the hi-tom to the mid-tom. When doing so, you'll have to quickly move the right hand out of the way of the left hand. This will help you avoid clicking your sticks, hitting rims or worst, your own hand as the left hand makes way to the mid-tom to hit it on count 2.

Single Stroke Seven #3

To work around this issue you'll have to practice this drum fill slowly at first. Leading it with the left hand is also a great solution for this problem. It's also a good way to strengthen your left hand.
Exercise #4 is an 8th note triplet drum fill. This exercise has the same rhythmic pattern as the previous one. The stroke orchestration and the hand with which you'll lead this pattern is what changes here. This is a great exercise for further developing your weaker hand.

Single Stroke Seven #4

Once you're done with this free drum lesson, you can move on to further expand your knowledge on the 40 drum rudiments by learning how to play patterns from another family of drum rudiments. We encourage you to take on the double stroke roll next.