Single Dragadiddle - Drum Rudiment

The single dragadiddle is one of the 40 International Drum Rudiments since 1984. The Percussive Arts Society (P.A.S.) was responsible for its inclusion, after settling on the expansion of the 26 drum rudiments with orchestral, drum corps, European, and contemporary drum rudiments. The single dragadiddle is of Swiss descent. It's also known as the Swiss single paradiddle.

The single dragadiddle is actually pretty similar to the single paradiddle. Their only difference can be found on the first stroke, which is played as a 32nd note double stroke on the single dragadiddle and a 16th note single stroke on the single paradiddle. Therefore, it's very important you learn how to play the single paradiddle and the drag ruff if you want to master the single dragadiddle way faster. The 32nd note double stroke is represented with a diagonal line on the note stems from the sheet music below.

Single Dragadiddle

You can count the single dragadiddle as 16th notes or as you would the single paradiddle: RR(drag or par) L(a) R(did) R(dle) LL(drag or par) R(a) L(did) L(dle).

Practice the single dragadiddle slowly at first. Get used to the stroke sequence before playing along to a metronome. Once you're able to perform a pretty accurate single dragadiddle, take the following drum beats and drum fills to your kit and have some fun with them.

Exercise #1 is a 32nd note drum beat. This pattern is pretty much like exercise #1 in the free drum lesson on the single paradiddle. Therefore, the single dragadiddle is broken up between the hi-hat and the snare drum. If you know how to play that drum beat effortlessly, you just have to double the first stroke on each count to have this one under your belt.

Single Dragadiddle #1

Exercise #2 is a 32nd note drum beat. This pattern is just like exercise #2 in the free drum lesson on the single paradiddle. If you've already mastered that pattern, you just have to remove the bass drum strokes on counts 2 and 4, and double the first stroke on each count to have this drum beat mastered.

Single Dragadiddle #2

Exercise #3 is a 32nd note drum fill. The 16th note doubles are played on the mid-tom and on the floor tom. Getting these doubles to sound even is the main challenge you'll find while practicing this drum fill at higher tempos. It's possible to work around this issue by checking the free drum lesson on the double stroke roll.

Single Dragadiddle #3

Exercise #4 is a 32nd note drum fill. This drum fill is a great example of the usefulness of paradiddle based drum rudiments. If you played the snare drum with single strokes only, it would not be possible to play the double on the ride cymbal on counts 2 and 4. So learning how to play paradiddle based drum rudiments will open up a lot more doors when it comes time to orchestrate your rhythmic phrases on the drum set.

Single Dragadiddle #4

This free drum lesson teaches you how to play the first of three patterns from the drag family of drum rudiments that incorporates the single paradiddle. Once you're done with this free drum lesson, move on to learn how to play the dragadiddle #1.