Double Paradiddle - Drum Rudiment

The double paradiddle was one of the patterns chosen to take part in the 26 American Drum Rudiments by members of the National Association of Rudimental Drummers (N.A.R.D.) in 1936. The double paradiddle was also featured in the 13 Essential Drum Rudiments. This was a subgroup of the 26 drum rudiments that encompassed the essential drum rudiments any drummer should know how to play. In 1984, the 26 drum rudiments were joined by 14 other drum rudiments, giving birth to the "40 International Drum Rudiments".

The word "paradiddle" in the name of a rudiment means that that particular pattern has two single strokes (para) followed by one set of doubles (diddle). The word "double" doesn't mean you'll have to play two paradiddles. It actually means you'll have to double the "para". Thus, we'll be having two extra single strokes on this paradiddle drum rudiment – R (dou or par) L (ble or a) R (pa) L (ra) R (did) R (dle). Since the double paradiddle is based on the single paradiddle, check that lesson as well. Knowing how to play the single paradiddle will make it a lot easier for you to learn how to play the double paradiddle.

Double Paradiddle

It's important you focus on learning how to play the double paradiddle with no tension at all, or any other drum rudiment for that matter. Start by memorizing the stroke sequence first. Once you have that down add the metronome in. You can move on to learn some double paradiddle drum beats and drum fill after you're able to play the double paradiddle with ease and control.

Exercise #1 is an 8th note triplet half-time drum beat. The double paradiddle is broken up between the hi-hat and the snare drum. The weaker hand plays the snare strokes and the stronger hand the hi-hat. So as you can see, the idea behind this exercise is the same one as that of the single paradiddle's first beat.

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Exercise #2 is an 8th note triplet broken hi-hat/ride half-time drum beat. The main difference between this exercise and the previous one can be found in the cymbal pattern, which is not only played on the hi-hat but on the bow of the ride cymbal as well. Don't forget to move the leading hand to the hi-hat to play the "trip" and the "let" of count 2.

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Exercise #3 is an 8th note triplet drum fill. The double paradiddle is broken between the snare drum and the floor tom. The weaker hand is kept on the snare drum while the stronger hand plays the floor tom. You may find yourself struggling to get consistent double strokes out of the floor tom. Use the tips given on the lesson about the double stroke roll to get around this issue.

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Exercise #4 is an 8th note triplet double paradiddle drum fill. The idea behind this drum fill is fairly similar to the previous one. However, the double paradiddle is broken up between the various drums instead of only between the snare drum and the floor tom.

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Once you're able to play the double paradiddle and the exercises herein accurately, you can move on to further expand your knowledge on the 40 drum rudiments. We encourage you to learn how to play the triple paradiddle next.